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Full text of "The juvenile singing school"

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THE 



JUVENILE 

SINGING SCHOOL. 

/ 

BY LOWELL MASON, & G. J. WEBB, 

PROFESSCiKS'.lM -THti B3STdN ;AC^))FJttV OF -KtoiSIC,'' 



BOSTON: 
J. H. WILKINS, & R. B. CARTER. 

1837 



II 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1837, 

BY J. H . WILKINS, & R . B. CARTER, 

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts. 

ADVERTISEMENT. 



The design of this work is to furnish such a collection of Songs as 
is wanted for juvenile classes and singing schools; or for common 
schools, and academies, where music is made a regular study, or where 
singing has been introduced. 

A part of the melodies are well known as " The Swiss Boy," " O 
say busy bee," Sec. ; some have been selected from German " School 
Song Books" and others are original. The variety is very great 
There a¥e .songs, adapted .to the different ^ages and circumstances of 
children a«d'^o4th,>a5i^. £ |^is believed thfetaft e!w£y instance the words 
will be found to be not only 'unexceptionable,' btft of good moral ten- 
dency. .!'•'" • 

To parents, , teachers, and pupifs/the "Juvenile Singing School'* 
is most re3^9&tful]fy jitspribict l ; ; y c '• / ; J 



boston: 

STEREOTYPED BY KIDDER AND WRI$HT r 

32 ; Congress Street. 



INDEX 



in 



Across the lake (The Bugle horn.) 

Awake ! awake ! the pearly dew drops (The morning horn.) 

Awake! awake! 'tis dawn 

Awake ye, awake ! - - 

Away ! away, we've a holiday (Holiday Song.) 

Away with pouting and with pining 

Before all lands in ,east or west 

Be sacred truth, my son, thy guide 

Cheerily, cheerily sound the merry strain (All are here.) 

Children go, to and fro - - - - 

Come and see the ripe fruit falling (Autumn.) 

Come away, come away (Swiss Boy.) 

Come, come, come (Summer song.) 

Come, sound the merry tabor ! sound 

Come, soft and lovely evening 

Every fruit is mellow (Harvest song.) 

Flowers, wild-wood flowers - 

Friends, awake ! (The morning call.) 

Glide along, our bonny boat (The bonny boat.) - 

Go at moonlight's fairy hour (Forget me not.) 

God is near thee (Be of good cheer.) 

Hail ! all hail ! thou merry month of May 

Haste thee, winter, haste away - 

How sweet the sound (Bugle song.) - 

How soft and lovely (May song.) 

Tf I've fulfilled my daily task aright (Evening song.) 

I know a fountain clear and bright 

I know a kindly angel (The child's angel.) - 

I love the little laughing rill (The rivulet.) 

In the thick and grassy wood (The Strawberry.) 

I saw at morning a floweret blue (The floweret.) 

Lo ! the blithesome lark is soaring (The Lark.) 

Morn amid the mountains - 

Morning is breaking - 

Murmur gentle lyre (Night song,) 

Near a silvery fountain (My home.) 

Night is stealing (Evening twilight.) 

Night's gloomy shades are flying (Summer.) 



IV 



Not the little circle round us (The wide world.) - 
Now nature smiles (Spring.) - 
Now night is gone (Morning.) 
Now the sun is in the west (The Cuckoo.) - 
Now the sun with burning glare (Summer.) 
Of late so brightly glowing (Lovely Rose.) - 
Oh, happy as the day is long (A pure heart.) 
Oh,' how brightly, how brightly (Swiss Boy.) 
Once, bright goddess, thou wast smiling (To music.) 
On the stormy ocean - - 

O say, busy bee - 
Our youthful hearts for learning burn (Away to school.) 
Out in a beautiful field (The pear tree.) - 
Oyer the mountain - 
See how calmly (Song of peace.) 
See our airy bubble (The soap bubble.) 
See, the day with rosy light 
See the shining dew drops (God is ever good.) 
See the morning star so bright -•.'-.•_/- 

See yonder rainbow (The Rainbow.) 
Shall school acquaintance be forgot (Auld lang syne.) 
Shall we oppressed with sadness - 

Stars of heaven that gaze on me - 
Summer joys are o'er (Winter Song.) 
Sweet spring is nigh - 

Sweet Summer days are declining (Departure of Summer.) 
The eastern hills' are glowing (The rising sun.) 
The flowers again are fresh and fair - 
The lovely moon hath risen (Evening Song.) 
The silvery moon (The Moon.) - 

The sweet birds are winging - 

This world is all a mighty choir - 

Through woodlands wild (Song of the birds.) 
'Tis dawn, 'tis dawn, 'tis dawn (Morning, noon and night.) 
Tis winter, winter far and wide 
When descends the golden sun 
When the dawn is faintly breaking 
When the first faint morning's ray 
Wilt thou hear a song to charm thee 



Would you list to the lay of a mountain boy 



(The Postillion.) 
(The herdsman's flute.) 
(Song of th® Bees.) 



THE 



JUVENILE SINGING SCHOOL. 

THE. RISING SUN. 



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Of him who dwells above ! 

Of him so great and glorious ! 
And yet so full of love. 



How nature now rejoices, 
With life and beauty new! 

On every grass-blade twinkles 
The pearly drop of dew. 



How good is he who made thee, 

Thou glorious orb of day ! 
With grateful hearts we'll praise him, 

In morning's earliest ray. 



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2 Now the glad sun breaking 
Pours a golden flood ; 
Deepest vales awaking 

Echo " God is good." 4 

Wake, and join the chorus, 
Man, with soul endued ! 
He whose smile is o'er us, 
God, oh God is good. 



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Through the leafy wood — 
Songsters sweetly singing, 
Warble " God is good !" 



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Fill the fresh air ; 

And the young breezes 
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In the green pastures 
Sparkles the dew : 

While the swift bees come, 
Humming anew. 



All things are happy 
In the fair light, 

Praising their Maker, 
Morning and night. 



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MAY SONG. 

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May joy and pleasure, 
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From morn to evening, 
From east to west. 



How sweet the sparkles 

Of early dew ! 
How rich the blossoms 

Of varied hue ! 



Our spring is fleeting, 
Our youth must end ; 

Then let us never 
Our time mis-spend. 



SONG OF PEACE. 



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See how calmly o'er the green, Earth and heaven send forth a voice: 
Silvery streams are flowing, " Now, be discord ended, 

Imaged there the stars are seen, " Live in peace, in love rejoice, 
Brightly, calmly glowing. "Heart and heart be blended. 



" Then thy life shall gently pass, 
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" Till thy happy home at last, 
" Welcome thee forever," 



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Like mist that flies 
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All sorrow now is gone ! 
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When woods around, 

Have heard the pealing horn ; 
From bush and brake 
The echoes wake, 

And hail the welcome mom r 



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How bright the trees ; 
How fresh the breeze ! 

How golden bright the day ; 
The sparkling rill 
Goes murmuring still, 

Through woodlands far away! 



THE MOON. 



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See where she comes,soft stealing She comes with night-dews healing 

Across the stilly night ! The soul with pain distressed ; 

How many hearts are hailing She wakes the sweetest feeling 

Her mild and friendly light. Within the lonely breast. 



Our eyes she gently closes 
When daily toil is o'er ; 

The weary earth reposes 

Beneath her soothing power. 



Our heavenly Father lends us 
This trusty friend by night ! 

May he a spirit send us, 
As pure as her pure light. 



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Seewhere the clouds are weaving, All nature now is silent, 
A rich and golden chain ; Except the passing breeze, 

See how the darkened shadow And birds their night-song warbling, 
Extends along the plain. Among the dewy trees. 



Sweet evening thou art with us, 
So tranquil, mild, and still ; — 

Thou dost, our thankful bosoms. 
With humble praises fill. 



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Who hath measured out your course? 
Whence thy arrowy light its source ? 
It hath sped full many a year, 
Ere it reached this earthly sphere. 



How his wondrous works of love 
Draw my eyes and thoughts above j 
There I see creation's Lord, 
By each twinkling star adored. 



Ah ! your life and beauty all 
Come at the Creator's call ; 
He that breathed in man a soul, 
Keeps you as in light you roll. 



Burn, my soul with heavenly fire ! 
Soar above yon starry choir ! 
Thou art in his image made 
"Who these heavenly hosts arrayed ! 



SPRING. 




1. Now nature smiles, gay flow'rets rise To greet returning 
Each gale that floats a - long the skies, Bears incense ^on its 




Each swelling heart breaks forth in song Mild zephyrs now breathe softly round, 

Of gratitude and praise \ The sky is calm and bright ; 

Through ail the groves the plumed throng O'er flowery meadows lambkins bound 

Pour forth their tuneful lays. In robes of snowy white : 

teach smiling flower the forest raises On every bank the bees are humming, 

Xn beauty blooms its silent praises, With sounds of joy the spring is coming, 

Its praises — its rais Is coming — is coming. 



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DEPARTURE OF SUMMER. 



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The woods that lately were ringing But spring, new beauties revealing 
Are silent now and lone ; Will soon return again, 

The warblers have ceased their singing, And brightly the sun will be shining 
Sweet summer-birds are flown. By mountain, grove and plain. 



Come winter, then, we will greet thee ? 

Thy robes are pure and white : 
Each blossom shall slumber sweetly 

The long-— long winter night. 



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Drives the mists along the valley; Ere the dew has left the bower, 
Come when first the distant horn, In the ruddy, purple beam 
Pealing wakes the joyful morn. 4 Come and see the vineyards 
Thou shalt feel a new-born pleasure [gleam. 

Gazing thus on autumn's treasure ; 
And thy joyful heart shall raise 
2 Sweeter songs of grateful praise. 



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Ice-bound trees are glittering, 
Merry snow-birds, twittering, 
Fondly strive to cheer 
Scenes so cold and drear. 



Winter, still I see 

Many charms in thee. 
Love thy chilly greeting, 
Snow-storm fiercely beating, 

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Let me feel the spring-tide ray ; 

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Quickly end thy dreary reign. 

Haste thee, winter, haste away, 
Far too long has been thy stay. 



Haste thee, winter, haste away, 
Let the spring come, bright and gay ; 
Let thy chilling breezes flee, 
Dreary winter, haste from me. 

Haste thee, winter, haste away, 
Far too long has been thy stay,. 



THE MORNING CALL. 
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See the sun with splendor beaming. 
O'er the distant waters streaming, 

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All awake ! awake ! awake ! 
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Thy silvery waters stray. 
Flow on, flow on, sweet fount ! and let me hear 
Thy somk so sweetly murmuring on my ear. 



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Now rocking thither, Along the tide, 

O'er the waters, blithe and gay! How we leave the shore behind, 
4 Onward then, our bonny boat ! 
All our hours 
Are twined with flowers, 
While we on the bright wave float. 



NIGHT SONG. 




Though the tones of sorrow 

Mingle in thy strain, 
Yet my heart can borrow 

Pleasure from the pain. 

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Hark! the quivering breezes 

List thy silvery sound — 
Every tumult ceases, 

Silence reigns profound. 



Hushed the thousand noises- 
Gone the noon-day glare j 

Gentle spirit-voices 
Stir the midnight air. 
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Earth below is sleeping, — 
Meadow, hill, and grove j 

Angel stars are keeping 
Silent watch above. 



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How still the world reposes, 
While friendly o'er it closes 

Soft twilight's mantle grey 
It seems a quiet chamber 
Where free from fear and danger 



Then peacefully reclining, 
To (rod our souls resigning, 
Sleep on, sleep safely on! 
Sweet slumber is a token 
Of purer rest unbroken, 



We sweetly sleep our griefs away. When this our earthly race is run. 



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How far away 
To greet the day, 

The lark is gaily singing; 
On spangled green 
The lambs are seen 



The woodlands 'round 
With songs resound, 

Each smiling plain rejoices; 
And murmuring rills, 
Among the hills 



O'er flowery meadows springing. Praise G od with thousand voices 



May he whose power, 
Each morning hour 

With thousand tongues is praising, 
Grant us to prove 
Our grateful love, 

Each heart glad incense raising. 



26 'TIS WINTER, WINTER FAR AND WIDE. 

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How desolate the hill and field, 
Away the flowers have hasted ; 

To winter's blast their beauties yield, 
And all their charms are wasted : — 

The trees will soon again be green, 

The beauteous flowers again be seen 

The earth with buds, &c. 



Oh, dark and chilly is the night, 
And long before the dawning j. 

As if it were the sun's delight, 
To rob us of the morning :- 

We care not for the night so long, 

For soon will come the days of song, 

The earth with buds, &c. 



The stream is frozen in the vale, 
And still the insect's thrumming ; 

Oh, where is now the nightingale, 
And where the bee, soft humming ? 

The waterfall will wake again, 

And bird and bee renew their strain ; 

The earth with buds, &c. 



The chilling frost conceals the ground, 
And snow so deep is lying j 

Without a pleasant sight or sound, 
The day of life is flying : 

The stormy wind will pass away, 

And warm will be the spring-tide ray, 

The earth with buds, &c. 



28 



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Faint, forlorn and weary, Frowning waves before thee, 

Helpless mortal 1 Heaven attend thee! Child of sorrow! Heaven attend thee! 
@od befriend thee! 4 God befriend thee! 

When the gloomy billow 

Seems thy dying pillow, 

Trembling spirit! Heaven attend thee! 

God befriend thee! 



32 



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Verdant hills and forests waving, 

On the mountain-side ; 
Running brooks the green banks laving 

With their mimic tide : 
Rivers vast, in torrents pouring 

Into boundless deep, 
See, lit up at sunset, showering 

Fire-flakes, as they sweep. 



Round wild breakers, fiercely dashing, 

Foams the stormy sea; 
In fair havens, lightly flashing, 

Surges die away. 
O'er yon tall heights, mantling proudly, 

Rise yet many more : 
O'er yon ocean, roaring loudly 

Others loudly roar. 



34 



HARVEST SONG. 



Andantino* 




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HARVEST SONG. 



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Autumn's coming on, 



Autumn's com - ing on. 



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Where the wind soft creeping, 

Lifts their leafy shade : 
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Golden colored deepening 

Into blushing red. 



See the busy maiden 
With her basket laden ! 

Apricot and plum ; 
Golden quince, and berries, 
Red and black she carries, 

Tripping lightly home. 



Every fruit is mellow, 
Every field is yellow, 

Summer days are gone ! 
Leaves the ground are strewing, 
Cooler winds are blowing, 

Autumn has begun. 




THE CHILD'S ANGEL. 



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Where'er in all his wand'rings, All day he'll smile so sweetly, 
He finds a gentle child, And then when night draws nigh 

The joy of friends and parents, Will bid him softly slumber 
So patient, good, and mild ; And close his weary eye ; 

In that bright home he long will dwell, And watch through all the silent night, 

And bless the child he loves so well. Around his couch till morning light. 



A PURE HEART. 



37 



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Thy pleasant thoughts are with thee still, Oh lovely child so bright and free, 
They quickly come when thou dost will j Must this cold world e'er narrow thee? 
And, self-amused, thou 'st never known, No f thou may'st live an endless youth, 
What 'tis to be left all alone. If thou wilt early love the truth. 

4 

Then shrink from nothing but the wrong, 

So thou shalt never want a song ; 

Sweet thoughts will ev'n unbidden start 

While thou dost keep a simple heart. 



38 



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THE STRAWBERRY. 
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Tell me strawberry, fresh and sweet, It was God who made you so — 
Who made all your red so shining, He your lively color brightens, 
Like the crimson sun declining, He your charming odor heightens; 
And who gave your pleasant smell? Humble vines and lofty wood, 
Tell me, pretty strawberry, tell. Ever tell us, " God is good." 



TO MUSIC. 



39 



Allegretto. 



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1. Once, bright goddess, thou wast smiling, In the starry courts above ; 



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Mistress of the golden lyre, 

Of the harp's melodious strain ; 
Thou canst bid the trembling wire 

Waken joy, cr solace pain. 
3 
Give me songs, when sunny pleasure* 

Fills my heart with joy and light i 
Soothe me with a sadder measure, 

In the gloom of sorrow's night. 
4 
Call the winning forms of beauty, 

By thy softest, sweetest note ; 
Fire my soul for truth and duty, 

When thy nobler numbers flo.'U. 



40 BE SACRED TRUTH, MY SON, THY GUIDE. 

Slowly and in exact time. ores. dint. 




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Thy heart shall then be free and light, 
And near the crystal spring, 

Thy music be more gay and bright 
Than where the wicked sing. 



For him no vernal sunshine smiles, 
No gales breathe softly round, 

And in the grave — that home of rest, 
No peace for him is found. 



For oh, no joy shall that man know, 
Who bears a guilty breast • 

His conscience drives him to and fro, 
And never lets him rest. 



6 



Oh, then be sacred truth thy guide, 

Until thy dying day ; 
Nor turn a finger's breadth aside 

From God's appointed way. 



Thy ^midren then shall nightly come, 
And weep around thy tomb ; 

And flowers above thy moistened grave 
Shall shed their sweet perfume. 



SEE, THE MORNING STAR 



41 



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Paler now, it paler beams, Happy hour, so bright and calm, 

'Tis morning ; We greet thee ! 

Eastern skies are bright with gleams All the air is breathing balm, 

Of dawning. How sweetly. 



Grateful earth her songs of praise 

Is pouring; 
Hallelujahs we will raise 

Adoring. 



42 WHEN THE DAY WITH ROSY LIGHT. 

Allegro. Wl 



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43 







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Oh ! tis sweet at early day 
Then to climb the mountain's side, 
Where the merry songster's lay, 
Sweetly echoes far and wide ; 
Noon may have its sunny glare, 
Eve, its twilight and its dew — « 
Night, its soft and cooling air, 
But give me morning blue. 



THE RIVULET. 




1 



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2. Oh! oft I've chased that sportive stream In 



all the 
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day, Goes sparkling, singing, dancing still, Through meadows far a - 
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And still I love to stand and gaze 
Along its winding shore ; 

And sing of happy, happy days 
That will return no more. 



But life, like thee, flows on, sweet rill, 
And I, like thee, must, haste 

Each day to do my Father's will, 
Nor turn one hour to waste. 



Lively. Coro. 



AWAKE YE, AWAKE. 
Soli. 



45 



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Awake ye, awake ! 
For the night is now departing, 

Awake ye, awake ! 
Up the mountain mists are creeping, 

Awake ye, awake ! 
See the diamond dew-drops sparkling, 

Awake ye, awake! 

Awake, 'tis day! 



46 



MY HOME. 



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Where the whispering bowers 

Lend a cooling shade, 
Where the sweetest flowers 

Deck the fragrant glade ; 
There I build my dwelling, 

Waving bough above ; 
There my notes are telling 

Tales of faithful love* 



When the bell's low pealing 

Tells the close of day, 
Homeward, softly stealing, 

Then I wing my way ; 
There, night's curtains o'er me, 

Hushed is all the grove, 
While I sing the story 

Of a Father's love. 



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Come, we'll seek the leafy grove, Then at night-fall, we will throng 
Sip the cooling fountain, Home,through balmy flowers, 

And when evening steals,we'll rove And with many a grateful song, 
Round the shady mountain. Bless the summer hours. 






NIGHT'S SHADES ARE FLYING. 




Allegro* 



/ 



49 






1. Night's gloomy shades are flying, The morning skies are bright ; 
And mountain peaks are glowing With wreaths of new born light. 



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hail, thou bright and blessed day! Loudthanks for each returning ray. 



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Great Source of light ! befriend us, 
While life's dark paths we tread ! 
And let thy smile attend us, 
When earthly lights are fled, 
And from thy safe and sacred way, 
Oh, never, never may we stray. 



50 



SAY, BUSY BEE. 



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say, pretty dove, whither now are you flying, 
Whither now are you flying, to London or Home t 
1 1 am bound to my nest where my partner is sighing, 
And waiting for me in my snug little home. 

Little home — little home — 
And waiting for me in my snug little home.' 

3 
So we, all so happy, while daily advancing 
In wisdom and knowledge, in virtue and love, 
Will sing on our way, in our progress rejoicing, 
As brisk as the bee, and as true as the dove. 

Will sing — will sing — 
As brisk as the bee, and as true as the dove, 



52 



Lively. 



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SONG OF THE BIRDS. 



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1. Through woodland wild, we sweet 



ly stray, Where 



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We build our sheltering nest on high, 
Where summer boughs are waving ; 
When night is nigh, :ll > R 
Then home we fly. J repeat. 



Fond love and peace within our nest, 
Have made their home so sweetly ; 

No fears molest :ll ) ™ f 

Their holy rest. ) ? 



As sweetly glides our life away, 
We chant our Maker's praises, 
In grateful lay :ll ) R t 

Through all the day. ) r 



54 



OVER THE MOUNTAIN. 




Andante. 



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1. - ver the mountain, and o - ver the moor, - - - 
Father is dead, and my mother is poor, And she 
Give me some food for my mother in cha - ri - ty ; 



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Call me not indolent beggar and bold enough, 

Fain would I learn both to knit and to sew ; 
I've two little brothers at home, when they're old enough* 
They will work hard for the gifts you bestow* 
Pity kind gentlemen, friends of humanity, 
Cold blows the wind, and the night's coming on; 
Give me some food for my mother, in charity, 
Give me some food, and then I will be gone. 



56 



SONG OF THE BEES. 



Allegro.™ 



1 . Wilt thou hear a song to charm thee ? List, the bees with busy wing, 



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SONG OF THE BEES. 



57 




la - bor springing, Ev • er cheerful, ev - er singing. 



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Come and see the busy dwelling, 
Airy chambers neat and fine ! 
How the waxen arches shine ! 
What sweet stores the white walls line, 
There not one his time w, wasting, 
Young and old to labor hasting, 
Ever cheerful, ever singing. 



List thou to the lovely music, 
List the bees the while they sing, 
Evermore with busy wing, 
" We must labor while 'tis spring ;" 
That's the song the bees are ringing : 
Up ! like them to labor springing, 
Ever cheerful, ever singing. 



58 



LOVELY ROSE. 



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round thee, Summer's beam with beauty crown'd thee, Sosweetly fair. 



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The blast too rudely blowing, 

Lovely rose, 
Thy tender form o'erthrowing. 

Lovely rose, 
Alas ! hath laid thee low. 
Now amid thy native bed, 
Envious weeds, with branches spread, 
Unkindly grow. 



No freshening dew of morning, 

Lovely rose, 
Thy infant buds adorning, 

Lovely rose, 
To thee shall day restore. 
Zephyrs soft, that late caress'd thee, 
Evening smiles, that parting bless'd thee, 
Eeturn no more. 



60 



THE BUGLE HORN. 



Allegro. Wl 

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THE BUGLE HORN. 
V 




The sky is clear, 

The flowers appear 
On every side so gay, 

The brook flows by, 

So merrily 
Along its pebbly way. 

The bugle horn, &c. 



The echoes flow 

As on we go 
Through forest, vale and lawn 

And far and near, 

Again we hear 
The winding bugle horn. 

The bugle horn, &c. 



62 



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THE FLOWERS AGAIN ARE FRESH AND FAIR. 
Lively. 



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THE FLOWERS AGAIN ARE FRESH AND FAIR. 63 

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The bowers are shaded well with green. 
And reddest roses peep between ; 
And muwic borne upon the gale, 
Is swelling over hill and dale. 



Before the breeze of spring doth float, 
So merrily my little boat ; 
Tht; birds are wheeling on the air, 
And flowers again are fresh and fair., 



64 THIS WORLD IS ALL A MIGHTY CHOIR. 

Allegretto. W* cres. m j*- f^-< r+ dim. 



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1. This world is 
The voice of 



all a mighty choir, And we the instruments there 
music, doth inspire, And at her signal we be « 



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And we the instruments therein ; 
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THIS WORLD IS ALL A MIGHTY CHOIR 



65 




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Andante is the poor-man's tempo; 
The rich in Allegro you'll find, 
With them it's Forte, Maestoso ; 
But we unheard, are oft behind ; 
Yet many a one plays very vainly, 
And many a harp is poorly strung ; 
And many you'll find expected only 
To blow the bellows all life long. 



66 AWAKE ! AWAKE, 'TIS DAWN, 

lavely. 



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Kise, and come forth, on nature gaze, Nor idly waste your 




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The birds, the birds now sing, 

And meadows, meadows ring ; 

With joyous sound ) ^ ^.^ 

Ot praise around, ) 
Sister awake ! with joy arise, 
Shake drowsy sleep from off your eyes. 

3 

Awake ! awake, 'tis dawn, 
The night, the night has gone, 
And now comes day ) R t ^^ 
With golden ray; ) 
"Rise, and come forth, on nature gaze,, 
Nor idly waste your precious days. 



68 AULD LANG SYNE AT SCHOOL. 

Andante. 






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AULD LANG SYNE AT SCHOOL. 



69 





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We oft have run about the fields, 
And culled the flowers fine ; 
We'll ne'er forget these hours, when they 
Are auld lang syne. 

For auld lang syne, &c» 



We oft have cheered each other's task, 
From morn till day's decline, 
But memory's night shall never rest 
Onauldlang syne. 

For auld lang syne, &c. 



Then take the hand that now is warm, 
Within a hand of thine ; 
No distant day shall lose the grasp 
Of auld lang syne. 

For auld lang syne, &c. 



70 



s 

\ 



Iiively^ 



THE POSTILLION. 
>_ > >_ 5y 



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THE POSTILLION. 



71 



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stall with speed he bounds, 



There his startling lash he sounds, • 



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See his steeds now proudly prancing, 
Through the city gates advancing, 
While the rising sun's all-gilding rays, 

Over mount and valley blaze :ll: 
Up and down the hills they fly, 
Now the plains before them lie* 
Click, clack, click, &c. 

3 
Then when night comes faintly darkling, 
And the peaceful stars are sparkling, 
Lo the goal is near — the glad steeds bound, 

Soon the rattling streets resound ; :ll: 
Now the post-horn pours its blast, 
While the sounding lash falls fast. 
Click, clack, click, &c. 



72 BEFORE ALL LANDS IN EAST OR WEST. 

Allegro, mf 

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. ~ - fore all lands in east or west, I love nr 



my native 



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land the best, With God's best gifts 'tis teem - ing; No 



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gold nor jewels here are found, Yet men of noble souls abound, And 

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BEFORE ALL LANDS IN EAST OR WEST. 



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eyes of joy are gleaming, And eyes of 



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joy are gleaming. 



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Before all tongues in east or west, 
I love my native tongue the best; 

Though not so smoothly spoken, 
Nor woven with Italian art : 
Yet when it speaks from heart to heart, 

The word is never broken. 



Before all people east or west, 
I love my countrymen the best, 

A race of noble spirit : — 
A sober mind, a generous heart, 
To virtue trained, yet free from art, 

They from their sires inherit. 

4 

To all the world I give my hand, 
My heart I give my native land : 

I seek her good, her glory ; 
I honor every nation's name, 
Respect their fortune and their fame, 

But I love the land that borp me. 



74 MORNING, NOON AND NIGHT. 

Allegro. Soli. * . m 






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1. 'Tis dawn, 'tis dawn, 'tis dawn, The 

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MORNING, NOON AND NIGHT. 

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starry heads are streaking Along the verdant lawn. 



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'Tis noon, 'tis noon, 'tis noon, 
Blue rise the hills before me, 
Blue smiles the azure o'er me, 
And radiant blossoms pour me, 

The balmy breath of June. 
'Tis noon, &c. 

3 
'Tis night, 'tis night, 'tis night, 
The world now hushed and still, 
Dim towers the shadowy hill, 
Earth's guardian spirits fill 

Their ways with softer light. 
'Tis night, &c. 



76 CHILDREN GO TO AND FRO. 

Lively. Semi-Chorus of small scholars. 






1. Children go to and fro, In a merry, pretty row; Footsteps light, Faces brigty 



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Do not look upon the ground ; 



Follow me, Full of glee, Singing merrily, 



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CHILDREN GO TO AND FRO. 77 

Full Chorus. 



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Singing merrrily, merrily, merrily, Singing merrily, merrily, 



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Birds are free, 
So are we, 
And we live as happily ; 
Work we do, 
Study too, 



Work is done, 
Play's begun, 
Now we have our laugh and fan 
Happy days, 
Pretty plays, 



Learning daily something new; And no naughty, naughty ways ; 
Then we laugh,and dance,and sing, Holdiug fast each other's hand, 
Gay as birds, or any thing. We're a cheerful, happy band 

Follow me, &c. Follow me, &c. 



78 COME, SOUND THE MERRY TABOR. 

Allegro. Solo or Duet. 



* WrFf e f t Y ffPwr 

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1. Come sound the merry tabor! sound The call to sport and play! She 



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COME, SOUND THE MERRY TABOR. 



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comes, she comes with garlands crown'd, The golden Queen of 



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She clothes the groves in glittering green, 

She smiles on hill and plain ; 
And mantling all her paths is seen, 

A rosy, blooming, train. 
Then sound the merry tabor, &c. 

3 
Her gentle breath inspires the air, 

And breathes soft music round, 
It gives the flowers a fragrance fair, 

The groves a silvery sound. 
Then sound the merry tabor, &c. 

4 
She strews her flowers along the heath, 

And up the mountain side, 
A glittering carpet spreads beneath, 

And fairy footsteps glide. 
Then sound the merry tabor, &c. 

5 
Beneath her soft enchanting hand, 

Old wrinkled care retires ; 
She mildly moves her magic wand, 

And harmless joy inspires. 
Then sound the merry tabor, &c. 



80 



Andante. P 

—= 1 is- — I 



THE HERDSMAN'S FLUTE, 
cres. j™j_ 






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1, When the first faint morning's 



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Sweetly peals the herds - man's flute, 



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Soft - est e - - choes waking, 



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THE HERDSMAN'S FLUTE. 
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2 3 

Lo ! impatient for the call, Now they graze where streamlets flow, 
Forth the herds are bounding, Climb the sunny mountain, 

Joyfully they quit the stall, While the herdsman pipes below, 

While the flute is sounding. Near the shady fountain. 

Tui, &c. Tui, &c. 



When the silvery evening star, 

Sees them homeward stealing, 
Listening peasants from afar, 
Hear that flute still pealing. 
Tui, &c. 
C 



82 



Andante. chorus . 



THE PEAR TREE. 



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3 

SOLO 1, 

What is there on the bough ? 

SOLO 2. 

A very pretty nest : 

CORO. 

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Bough on the branch, 
Branch on the tree, 
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4 

SOLO 1. 

What is there in the nest ? 

SOLO 2. 

A very pretty egg : 

CORO. 

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5 

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What is there in the egg ? 

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CORO. 

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Out in a beautiful field, &c. 



84 



THE CUCKOO. 



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Cheerful see yon shepherd boy, 

Climbing up the cragged rocks, 
As he views the dappled sky, 

Pleased the cuckoo's note he mocks ; 
Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, 

Pleased the cuckoo's note he mocks. 
Now advancing o'er the plain, 

Evening's dusky shades appear ; 
And the cuckoo's voice again, 

Softly steals upon the ear ; 
While retiring from the view, 

Thus she bids the day adieu. 
Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, 

Thus she bids the day adieu. 



, Andante* 




GOD IS EVER GOOD 



87 



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See the morning sun beams 
Lighting up the wood, 

Silently proclaiming 
God is ever good. 



In the leafy tree tops 
Where no fears intrude, 

Merry birds are singing 
God is ever good. 



•Hear the mountain streamlet 

In the solitude, 
With its ripple saying 

God is ever good. 



Bring my heart thy tribute, 
Songs of gratitude ; « 

While all nature utters, 
God is ever good. 



S8 HAIL ! ALL HAIL ! THOU MERRY MONTH OF MAY. 
_ /Allegro. | mj) 



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Hark ! hark ! hark ! To hail the month of May, 
How the songsters warble on the spray ! 
And we will be as blithe as they, 
Then away, to hail, &c. 



90 



THE SWEET BIRDS AKE WINGING. 



Allegro. 



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Companions to meet us 
Are now on their way, 

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The cattle are lowing, 

Come ! up from your hay, 

And quickly be going, 
The morning is May ; 
Sing, shepherds, &c. 



The sweet birds are winging 
From arbor to spray, 

And cheerily singing 

Of spring-time and May ; 
Sing, shepherds &c. 



92 WHEN DESCENDS THE GOLDEN SUN. 

Allegretto. 




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WHEN DESCENDS THE GOLDEN SUN. 

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Hear the loud and joyful strain, 
Leading cheerily and happily the homeward troop along- 
Hark, I hear them calling now, 
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'Tis the signal, 'tis the signal of the merry mountain song* 
See they gather on their way, 

La ra la, La ra la, 
Hear them pipe their welcome lay, 

La ra la, La ra la, 
We will join the tuneful cry, 
One and all we give reply, 

Ho ye, ho, Ho ye, ho, Ho ye, ho, 



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BE OF GOOD CHEER. 




1. God is near thee, Therefore cheer thee, Sad soul ! 



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Calm thy sadness, 
Look in gladness 

On high ! 
Faint and weary, 
Pilgrim, cheer thee ! 

Help is nigh ! 



Mark the sea-bird 
Wildly wheeling 

Through the skies, 
God defends him, 
God attends him, 

When he cries ! 



God is near thee, 
Therefore cheer thee, 

Sad soul ! 
He'll defend thee, 
When around thee, 

Billows roll. 



96 



1 



HOLIDAY SONG. 



Allegro. 



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Give us forests with trees and flowers, 
Then off to the woods we'll away, we'll away, ) % e7)eat 

So merry our holiday hours. J ^ 



We'll watch the birds in the woody vale, 
As from bough to bough they are springing, 

Our voices shall echo from hill and from dale, ) ^ veatt 
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Away ! away we've a holiday, 

And we'll off to the woods together, 
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We'll bound o'er the bending heather. ) 



98 



Allegro. 



THE MORNING HORN. 



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THK MOKJN1JNG HORN. 99 



sunny hill ; Awake! awake ! The sunny hill — Awake ! awake! awake I 



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Awake ! awake \ 
The sun is up above the cloudy mountains, 
The crimson hue from the sky is gone, 
Like pearls the light plays in the fountain ; 
We'll climb the hill side where weaves the corn, 
And list to the sound of the morning horn — 

Awake ! awake ! 

The morning horn- 
Awake ! awake ! awake ! 



Awake ! awake ! 
The morning light — the morning light gives pleasure ,. 
It makes us happy-— it gives us health, 
The morning so fresh is a treasure — 
The horn is winding, awake and hear, 

It echoes, it echoes, 

The sound is near — 
Awake ! awake ! awake !. 



100 



AWAY WITH POUTING. 



Allegretto. 






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The streamlet purls and plays as lightly, 

As when it danced to Eden's breeze ; 
The lovely moon still beams as brightly, 

As when she shone through Adam's trees. 
The smile of joy each moment meets us, 

While through this pilgrimage we roam, 
At every turn her presence greets us, 

To cheer us on our journey home. 



102 



SWISS BOY. 



Cheerfully. 



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fields bright with dew we will stray ; The new mown hay 



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OH, HOW BRIGHTLY. Music— Swiss Boy. 
1 

Oh! how brightly, how brightly the sun moves along, 

From the east to the west, through the sky ; 
Oh ! how lovely, how lovely the moon looks among 
All the stars as they sparkle on high ! 
These glorious lights to us were given, 
To raise our thoughts from earth to heav'n :— 
Oh ! how brightly, how brightly they all move along> 
Shedding light o'er the world from on high. 
2 
Oh! how swiftly, how swiftly the bird flies away 

To his home in the tall forest tree ; 
Oh! how sweetly, how sweetly he sings all the day, 
And is happy as happy can be ! 
'Tis thus he tells of favors given, 
And while he sings, he soars to heav'n : — 
Oh! how sweetly, how sweetly he sings all the day> 
In his nest on the tall forest tree. 
3 
And the roses, the roses, and lilies so fair, 

Which we pluck from the green fields in May, 
Fill with fragrance, with fragrance, the fresh morning air, 
And to usVs they bloom, seem to say, 
By whom their sweet perfume was given, 
And thus they send it back to heaven : — 
Oh ! the roses, the roses, and lilies so fair, 
Fill the air, fill the air, all the day. 



104 SHALL WE OPPRESSED WITH SADNESS. 



Allegretto. Wl 



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In sweet harmonious measures, 

Our joyful songs we'll bring, 
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We'll merrily, merrily sing, 
La, la. 
While valleys crowned with flowers. 

And birds on soaring wing, 
Incite our tuneful powers, 

We'll cheerily, cheerily sing, 
La, la. 



106 



THE SOAP BUBBLE. 



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.Allegretto. 



1. See our airy bubble, lightly dancing, Far a - 



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THE SOAP BUBBLE. 



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Youthful hearts that now so brightly glowing, 
Borne away by airy hope on high ; 

Quickly will a breeze more harshly blowing, 
Bid each lovely, golden vision fly. 



Thoughtless man ! gay dreams around thee hover, 
Pomp and pride their richest charms display; 

But how soon their empty reign is over, 
Like yon globe they quickly pass away. 



8 THE RAINBOW. 

n 7YI Allegretto. " m T ==== ^ 




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The purple blush of dewy morning', 

No more its brightness shows ; 
The fairest tint the rose adorning, 

No more in beauty glows. 



Some clime celestial must have lent thee, 

Thy robe of many dyes ; 
Bright rainbow ! tell us who has sent thee, 

To charm our wondering eyes. 



Ah ! none but He could paint thy beauty, 

His skill and power alone ; 
Thou art a beam of light on duty, 

From the ETERNAL SUN/ 



110 AWAY TO SCHOOL. 

Allegro. Chorus. 



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1. Our youth - ful hearts for learning burn, A 

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Behold ! a happy band appears, 

Away, away to school. 
The shout of joy now fills our ears, 

Away, away to school. 
Our voices ring, our hands we wave, 
Our hearts rebound with vigor brave, 
Away to school, away to school, 

Away, away to school. 



No more we walk, no more we play, 
Away, away to school. 

In study now we spend the day, 
Away, away to school. 

United in a peaceful band 

We're join'd in heart, we're join'd in 
Away to school, away to school, 
Away, away to school. 



hand, 



112 



1 



SWEET SPRING IS NIGH. 



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New life and new happiness bringing j 

The garlands twine, 

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And the birds now sweetly are singing, 



Then come and sing, 
And dance and spring, 
In many a frolicsome measure ; 
Through all the day 
Well join and play, 
R And rejoice in innocent pleasure. 



U4 



THE MOUNTAIN BOY. 



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THE MOUNTAIN BOY. 



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In that cottage near, 
Is my mother dear, 



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And home looks so sweetly, 

So smiling, so neatly, 

I love it completely, 

Return to it fleetly ; 
If but little I can do, 
Still the work I try to cheer 
Of my mother ever dear, 

While around, &c. 

3 At the sun's swift decline, ) 

When the hill tops shine, > Repeated. 

Oh ! my mother then I join ; ) 

When evening relieves me, 

She kindly receives me, 

And oh ! when she gives me, 

Her blessing and leaves me, 
What sweet slumbers then are mine, 
Oh ! what slumbers then are mine — 
What sweet slumbers then are mine ; 

Till the morn, when the cries 

Of the shepherds arise, 

And the joy of the hills 

All the welkin fills : 
El u rel, &c. 



118 



ALL ARE HEEE. 



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ALL ARE HERE. 



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Who has loitered by the way ? And who for i - die 



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Cheerily, cheerily, sound the merry strain, 
Happily, happily, now we meet again, 

All are here; :ll: 
All who love the morning's prime, 
All who feel the worth of time, 
Lo we'll sound the merry chime, 

All are here ! all are here ! 



120 

Allegretto* 




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And such the story of pride and power, 
They bloom at morning like that fair flower ; 
At evening seek them- — their forms are fled, 
Their days are numbered, their race is sped. 



And thou, vain beauty, come draw thee near, 
And learn a lesson of wisdom here ! 
Seek fairer flowers that bloom on high, 
Whose light and fragrance shall never die. 



122 



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Thousand warblers now are springing 
Up to meet the welcome morn ; 

Sky and grove with joy are ringing, 
Hark, the wild, entrancing horn ! 



Every mountain altar blazes ; 

Incense sweet to heaven ascends ; 
Meadows waft their silent praises, 

Every flower adoring bends. 



Man ! awake from heavy slumbers, 
Morning breaks serenely bright ; 

Songs of praise in tuneful numbers, 
Kaise to Him who rules the night. 



124 



EVENING TWILIGHT. 



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EVENING TWILIGHT. 



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From the mountains, forests, fountains, 
Softly fades the light of day. 

Only round yon fir-clad summit, 
Heavenward soaring, 
Lingers yet one golden ray. 



Evening breezes, incense breathing, 
Murmur through the linden grove ; 

Nearer now the curtain closes, 
Man reposes 
In the arms of heavenly love. 



26 



EVENING SONG. 



Allegretto. ^ 




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But woe to him, whose eye, that hour is dim 

With sin-remembering tears ! 
No anguish ever can restore to him, 
The joys of wasted years ! 
Oh, precious is the power, 

And time that God hath given ! 
May I each passing hour, 

Lay up some store for heaven ! 



128 

Andante.^/) 



FORGET ME NOT. 



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little lovely flower— Be that lovely flow'ret thine— Be that 




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~Mild as heaven's own blue, it beameth 



Like a clear and cloudless sky ; 



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lovely flow'ret thine. 



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Image of true love, it seemeth, 
To the heart sweet words to sav. 

_„- 3 

Hhr And methinks its blue eyes glisten, 
idfcr Full of love and tender thought, 
While from far it whispers listen, 
Oh ! forget, forget me not ! 



MAY 6 1926